Urge your elected officials to identify funding and solutions to address flooding now.


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The Issue

Flooding in the Lowcountry is not a new problem. Just ask any resident of Charleston County and you’ll likely hear a story. Due to its low-lying coastal elevation, close proximity to rivers and the ocean, and poorly planned development on filled-in wetlands, Charleston County has experienced drainage and flooding complications for hundreds of years. Flooding in the region is attributed to:

  • Tidal flooding and storm surge resulting from extreme weather
  • Flash flooding that overburdens outdated drainage infrastructure
  • Riverine flooding caused by heavy and prolonged rainfall that overwhelms the capacity of river and stream channels

(Photo credits: Jared Bramblett)

Shallow Coastal Flooding Risk

 

In 2016 alone, Charleston County experienced 50 days of tidal flooding. This is a staggering increase from an average of four days just 50 years ago. It no longer takes a catastrophic storm to cause flooding. Municipalities in our region now experience significant flooding when rainfall is paired with a high tide. Flooding impacts vital transportation routes and causes major disruptions in travel and commuter patterns, and it major property damage.

Our coastal region is incredibly vulnerable. In fact, the Berkeley, Charleston, Dorchester region ranks in the top 15 U.S. metro regions that are most prone to hurricane-driven storm surge damage. Scientists predict that sea level will rise 2.5 feet over the next 50 years. What does this mean for the Lowcountry? Simply put, tidal flooding could occur as often as 180 days in the year 2050. The time is now for Charleston County to address the problem and enable our community to prepare for, respond to and recover from flooding.

Category 1 Storm Surge

Mayoral Candidate Q&A

Report Flooding

Have you encountered rain to tide related flooding? Snap a picture with your phone and submit it here. You can help us to identify problem areas and assess the magnitude of the issue. You can upload a picture right away, or later from your photo library. Here’s how to upload your images:

  • Click the red Report Flooding button below
  • Select what type of flooding you’re reporting (tidal or rain-related flooding)
  • Click the green Submit a Report button
  • Enter a few details about your photo (date, location, description)
  • Finally, click the Report It button

Photos from your neighbors

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Testimonials

Get Involved

But first, sign our petition.

The first step to get involved in our community campaign is to sign our petition and urge your local officials in Charleston County to find and fund immediate solutions for flooding.

Then, connect with your elected officials.

Next, you can contact your local representatives by phone or email or attend an upcoming meeting. Please call or email your representative and let them know you’re concerned about flooding in your community. Tell a personal story of how flooding is impacting your life. Remember, a phone call, letter, or comments at a public meeting are the most effective forms of advocacy. Find your representative’s contact info and connect with them quickly using our Local Representative Finder App or our online action center.

If you live in the City of Charleston, check out the City’s Infrastructure Story Map to track major drainage infrastructure projects that are on the docket. You can find information about the cost for completion and anticipated timeline. Use this information to advocate for funding to be allocated immediately to complete these projects little by little.

More information about what the City is doing to address flooding and increase resilience can be found here: https://www.charleston-sc.gov/resilience.

Show up at council meetings and ensure local elected officials remain laser focused on flooding and that their actions back up their statements.

Here is a list of upcoming meetings where you can raise your voice:

  • Tuesday, March 12 at 6:30 p.m. — Charleston City Council
  • Tuesday, March 12 at 6 p.m. — Mount Pleasant Town Council
  • Thursday, March 14 at 7 p.m. — North Charleston City Council
  • Shem Creek Area Management Plan Public Meeting — Tuesday, March 19 at 5 p.m. — Mount Pleasant Town Council
  • Thursday, March 21 at 5 p.m. — Charleston City Council
  • Thursday, March 28 at 7 p.m. — North Charleston City Council
  • Thursday, April 4 at 5 p.m. — Charleston City Council
  • Tuesday, April 9 at 6 p.m. — Mount Pleasant Town Council
  • Tuesday, April 9 at 6:30 p.m. — Charleston City Council
  • Thursday, April 11 at 7 p.m. — North Charleston City Council
  • Thursday, April 18 at 5 p.m. — Charleston City Council
  • Tuesday, April 23 at 6:30 p.m. — Charleston City Council
  • Thursday, April 25 at 7 p.m. — North Charleston City Council
  • Thursday, May 2 at 5 p.m. — Charleston City Council
  • Tuesday, May 7 at 6:30 p.m. — Charleston City Council
  • Thursday, May 9 at 7 p.m. — North Charleston City Council
  • Tuesday, May 14 at 6 p.m. — Mount Pleasant Town Council
  • Thursday, May 16 at 5 p.m. — Charleston City Council
  • Thursday, May 23 at 7 p.m. — North Charleston City Council
  • Thursday, May 30 at 5 p.m. — Charleston City Council
  • Tuesday, June 4 at 6:30 p.m. — Charleston City Council
  • Tuesday, June 11 at 6 p.m. — Mount Pleasant Town Council
  • Thursday, June 13 at 5 p.m. — Charleston City Council
  • Thursday, June 13 at 7 p.m. — North Charleston City Council
  • Tuesday, June 18 at 6:30 p.m. — Charleston City Council
  • Thursday, June 27 at 7 p.m. — North Charleston City Council
  • Tuesday, July 9 at 6 p.m. — Mount Pleasant Town Council
  • Thursday, July 11 at 7 p.m. — North Charleston City Council
  • Thursday, July 18 at 5 p.m. — Charleston City Council
  • Tuesday, July 23 at 6:30 p.m. — Charleston City Council
  • Thursday, July 25 at 7 p.m. — North Charleston City Council
  •  

    Charleston City Council meets at the Charleston County Administrator’s Office, 4045 Bridge View Dr, North Charleston.

    North Charleston City Council meets at North Charleston City Hall, 2500 City Hall Lane, North Charleston.

    * Please note: If you plan to speak at a North Charleston City Council meeting, you will need to notify the clerk ahead of time. You can fill out a request form here.

    Mt. Pleasant City Council meets at the Mt. Pleasant Municipal Court, 100 Ann Edwards Lane, Mount Pleasant.

    Who We Are

    We are a local, community-driven, diverse, grassroots movement advocating for solutions and funding to address flooding in Charleston County now. We are demanding action to protect our neighbors, coastal communities, homes, businesses, natural resources and quality of life.

    Our campaign is powered by a coalition of local residents, business owners, community groups and historic preservation and environmental nonprofits. The goal of Fix Flooding First is to create positive, immediate change locally to address flooding. Our first initiative is calling on our elected officials to allocate available dollars from Charleston County’s 2016 half-cent sales tax to fund urgent drainage projects.

    Our supporters include:

    Press

     April 2019 – ensia online publication
    Across the U.S., flood survivors are growing in number – and they aren’t just seeking restitution, but answers ensia online

     April 2019 – Post and Courier
    Editorial, learn the right lessons from Church Creek’s flooding problems

     April 2019 – Post and Courier
    Tree planting effort in upstream SC swamp could help Charleston area’s flooding woes

     April 2019 – Post and Courier
    Editorial: Charleston at risk if glaciers keep melting

     April 2019 – Post and Courier
    Hicks column: Charleston floods governor’s office with request for emergency care

     April 2019 – Post and Courier
    Facing flooding, Mount Pleasant considers large hike in annual stormwater fee

     April 2019 – Business Insider
    7 American cities that could disappear by 2100

     April 2019 – Scientific American
    Rebuilt wetlands can protect shorelines better than walls

     April 2019 – Post and Courier
    Hospital services may be compromised if Charleston doesn’t address flooding

     March 2019 – Post and Courier
    Five common myths and misconceptions about flooding risks

     March 2019 – Post and Courier
    Changes to flood insurance program to go into effect in 2020, SC rates will change

     March 2019 – Myrtle Beach Online
    SC senators move to weaken dam safety laws in a state where dams break every year

     March 2019 – Post and Courier
    SC’s flood insurance rates could see massive changes with new FEMA program

     March 2019 – Yale Environment
    As high-tide flooding worsens, more pollution is washing to the sea

     March 2019 – Post and Courier
    No exceptions to Church Creek stormwater rules

     March 2019 – NPR online
    How federal disaster money favors the rich

     March 2019 – Post and Courier
    Another Church Creek project runs afoul of flood rules, but this one has already started

     March 2019 – SeaLevelRise.org
    South Carolina’s Sea Level is Rising

     February 2019 – Post and Courier
    Warm seas could spell stronger hurricanes for SC, but other signs still uncertain

     February 2019 – Post and Courier
    In Charleston area, road closures, some major flooding liner after unusually high tide

     February 2019 – SC State Climatology Office online journal
    Tropical Cyclone Florence in South Carolina

     February 2019 – Post and Courier
    US military prepping for sea rise in SC as federal funding stalls

     February 2019 – Post and Courier
    Charleston’s next flood protection measure may face some choppy waters

     February 2019 – Post and Courier
    Folly Beach enters legal effort to determine who owns fast-eroding land

     February 2019 – Post and Courier
    A look inside how Charleston’s Crosstown drainage project will help control flooding

     February 2019 – Post and Courier
    Fix past flooding mistakes, prevent future problems

     February 2019 – Post and Courier
    Fix past flooding mistakes, prevent future problems

     February 2019 – Post and Courier
    Charleston’s new flood building rules may scuttle West Ashley subdivision

     February 2019 – Post and Courier
    Sea rise along South Carolina coast accelerating faster than realized, researcher says

     January 2019 – The Battalion
    Researchers examine urban flooding

     January 2019 – Post and Courier
    While Charleston works on clearing up FEMS’s concerns, one neighborhood left in limbo

     January 2019 – Flood Economics
    While Charleston works on clearing up FEMS’s concerns, one neighborhood left in limbo

     January 2019 – Post and Courier
    Commentary: it’s time to end the costly flood and fix cycle

     January 2019 – Post and Courier
    Charleston to eye innovative flooding solutions for West Ashley, Johns Island and downtown

     January 2019 – Post and Courier
    Coastal Conservation League surveying who would take buyouts for flooded homes

     January 2019 – Post and Courier
    Approved developments that don’t meet latest flood standards to see more scrutiny

     December 2018 – Post and Courier
    Proposed state fund would help facilitate flood buyouts in SC

     December 2018 – Post and Courier
    Charleston beefs up 2019 drainage fund, creates new stormwater department

     December 2018 – Post and Courier
    Charleston’s Crosstown drainage project to cost $43 million more, reasons still vague

     8/21/18 – Washington Post
    Sea level rise is already costing property owners on the coast

    8/20/18 – Post and Courier
    Editorial: Charleston County missed a big chance to address flooding

    8/17/18 – Post and Courier
    James Island residents say governments are causing floods by neglecting drainage systems

    8/16/18 – Post and Courier
    A downtown home will be torn down after flooding left the owner unable to sell

    8/14/18 – Post and Courier
    Editorial: Law that keeps flooding history a secret makes no sense

    8/11/18 – Post and Courier
    We need to help people move to higher ground

    8/9/18 – Post and Courier
    Little-known federal law keeps buyers from finding out if a home routinely floods

    8/3/18 – Post and Courier
    Editorial: Without flood insurance reform, Congress leaves Charleston homeowners at risk

    8/1/18 – Post and Courier
    Editorial: Johns Island has a flooding problem. Charleston’s zoning rules ignore that.

    7/30/18 – Post and Courier
    They lost cars in the flood. Now, Enston Homes residents are losing affordable housing, too.

    7/30/18 – Post and Courier
    Editorial: Protect North Charleston from floodwaters too

    7/25/18 – Post and Courier
    After floods swamp neighborhoods, no hope in sight for these North Charleston residents

    July 24, 2018 – Post and Courier
    Editorial: Fight against Charleston flooding goes nuclear

    7/23/18 – Post and Courier
    Residents asking feds to investigate Charleston for failure to protect against flood risks

    7/20/18 – WCSC Live 5 News
    Crosstown reopen after major flash flooding event in Lowcountry

    7/20/18 – WCIV News 4
    WATCH: Charleston’s Crosstown flooding as seen by drone

    7/20/18 – WCIV News 4
    Crosstown reopens, other Charleston area streets remain closed for flooding

    7/20/18 – Post and Courier
    Charleston’s WestEdge development promising to fix the area’s flooding problems

    7/20/18 – Post and Courier
    Editorial: Of course Charleston tourism and flooding are related

    7/4/18 – Post and Courier
    Heavy rain and flooding dampen Charleston’s Fourth of July morning, but skies are clearing

    6/24/18 – Post and Courier
    Editorial: Higher seas threaten flood-prone Charleston

    6/22/18 – WCBD News 2
    Community bands together to fix flooding

    6/21/18 – Live 5 News
    Coalition asking Charleston County Council to ‘Fix Flooding First,’ before roads

    6/21/18 – Post and Courier
    ‘Fix Flooding First:’ Lowcountry-wide group pushes for action on drainage problems

    Petition

    Urge your elected officials to identify funding and solutions to address flooding now.